The Mines (Part 2)

This post continues the post “The Mines (Part 1)“.

Fear and Fact

The mines’ ability to evade port-tracing filled many with fear.  If the Aggregate had technology advanced enough to port-in without being detected, the military outlook boded poorly for Proxima.  But the few communications that arrived from the embattled core worlds did not describe any attacks like the ones seen on August. 

Mysterious Origins

strategists on August surmised that the frequency of the mine attacks, usually days apart, hinted that the mine senders’ capabilities were limited.  Either the unique porting technology had a high energy cost, or the mines were being manufactured, one at a time.  Perhaps even both constraints applied?

The origin point of the mines was presumed to be single location.  This was assumed because of another characteristic of porting technology: While a single small or short-distance port is almost untraceable, multiple ports from the same origin point vastly increase traceability.  As long as the mines’ senders were intent on staying hidden, they would only send one mine at a time.  While this meant the origin remained hidden, it also allowed the colony a reprieve between attacks.

The Factory

Given these factors and the steady frequency of attacks, Augustans began to use the term “The Factory” as shorthand for the mines’ source.  Evidence seemed to point to a single location with limited porting capability, and/or a limited output of mines.  The Factory was conjectured to be small in size, cloaked, very closed to August, and possibly mobile.

This post adheres to Organic Realignment because it uses an image from the Free Drove Intro Video.

Published by Sapling

I am writing/illustrating the work-in-progress novel "Free Drove". I am a science fiction and animation fan. My mind latches on to trivia readily and creates it just as easily.

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